Category Archives: Mobile Marketing Magazine

Sun Erects Digital Paywall

The Sun’s digital content is now behind a paywall, costing subscribers £2 per week after a trial period of two months’ access for just £1. 

The Sun’s website – which isn’t optimised for mobile browsers – along with its apps can now only be accessed by paying subscribers. A spokesperson confirmed that the company’s apps will still offer ad placements to advertisers looking to reach its audience behind the paywall. 


The digital package can be accessed on iPhone 4 plus or Android handests running version 2.3 and above, but Sun+Goals football content and Sun+Perks offers require iOS6 or Android 4.3 to work.


Print readers can also be part of the fun if they collect 20 unique codes from the newspaper, which will grant them a month’s access to Sun+ across desktop, mobile and tablet.


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/sun-erects-digital-paywall#SUZEfG5tDrSpumdJ.99

O2 4G Switch On 29 August

O2 has announced its 4G switch on date, with London, Leeds and Bradford the first cities to be covered when the service launches on 29 August. Having spent nearly a full year becoming increasingly overcome with fatEEgue, O2’s announcement could not come a moment too soon.

But it is clear that the second operator to go live with superfast broadband has a lot of catching up to do – EE has already signed up 500,000 customers and its network covers 55 per cent of the population. After launch, O2 has promised 10 more cities by the end of the year: Birmingham, Newcastle, Glasgow, Liverpool, Nottingham, Leicester, Coventry, Sheffield, Manchester and Edinburgh. 

Although O2 has announced plans to match EE’s commitment to reach 98 per cent of the population –  and has highlighted that its valuable 800MHz frequency will ensure the service works ‘both indoor and outdoor’ – the company has not yet ventured a deadline for this.  EE has pledged to reach 98 per cent of people by the end of 2014, and owns 36 per cent of the country’s total 4G spectrum compared to O2’s 15 per cent. 

Tariffs will start at £26 per month – most likely a SIM-only, 500MB-data option akin to the £23 option EE introduced in May – with pay-as-you-go and business packages on the way. EE already has 2,000 UK businesses, including the likes of Renault and Ikea, on its books. 

In a clear drive to differentiate itself, O2 has announced a mystery live launch performance at the Shepherd’s Bush Empire to coincide with the switch on, with early-bird ticketing on offer for its Priority Moments customers. 4G customers will also be able to get a free, year-long music package when they sign up direct with O2. 

O2 says it spent £550m to secure one of the highest proportions of the lowest frequency spectrum as it travels further and can move better through solid objects. Data usage by its 22.9m existing UK customers has already more than doubled in the last twelve months, the company said. EE, which formed in 2010 from Orange and T-Mobile, revealed it has 27.5m customers in its last earnings call.

Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/o2-4g-switch-29-august#bOOEGeCZ8ujVtR4b.99

Analysis: Yahoo’s Q2 Results and Mayer’s First Year as CEO

Yahoo’s Q2 earnings call is something of a judgement on Marissa Mayer’s first 12 months in the job – as she took over as CEO almost exactly a year ago – but the mixed picture shows that much of the hard work is still to be done. 

GAAP revenue stood at $1.14bn (£750m), a seven per cent decrease on a year ago, but on a brighter note, profits increased by 46 per cent to $331m, largely as a result of Yahoo’s investment in Chinese eCommerce site, Alibaba. If you take revenues minus traffic acquisition costs (the money internet companies pay out to affiliates and other third parties who drive traffic to their sites), revenues are down just 1 per cent from $1.08bn to $1.07bn, and remain flat from the previous quarter. Yahoo’s display revenue was $472m, a 12 per cent decrease compared to a year ago, and search was down nine per cent to $418m. 


Reacting to the results, Karsten Weide, IDC’s program VP of digital media and entertainment, told Mobile Marketing: “Yahoo’s stock price has gone up by 70 per cent since Marissa Mayer took over, and that has made a lot of people happy. However, most of that growth was due the perceived value of Yahoo’s stake in Alibaba. Alibaba will soon go public, and people think it is going to send a lot of money Yahoo’s way, and theirs. 


“In terms of Yahoo’s core business, not much has happened that would justify this increase in stock price. Display advertising has been weak lately. For one, that’s because a lot of display advertising now goes mobile, and Yahoo is weak on the mobile platform. For another, a lot of advertising agencies now want to buy advertising automatically and in this new, so-called ‘programmatic trading’ segment, Yahoo is weak, while Google and Facebook are strong.” 


Acquisitions 


Yahoo spent a net $1bn in cash for acquisitions during the period, $970m of this on Tumblr. Mayer counts eight buyouts, including Astrid, GoPollGo, MileWise, Loki Studios, Tumblr, Playerscale, Ghostbird and Rondee, plus Summly, although this closed late in Q1 and was announced in the previous earnings call. Eight of these had some mobile element to them, everything from the Summly news aggregator to Astrid’s popular productivity apps and location-aware gaming from Loki Studios. 


“Generally, companies of their size are buying mobile start-ups – they need the talent, especially user interface and user experience, along with audience and ideas,” said Julie Ask, VP and principal analyst at Forrester. “Consumers’ time is increasingly spent on mobile devices – whether a phone or a tablet or other. Yahoo and others who depend on ad revenue need large, engaged audiences there – not only for growth, but also to maintain a revenue base.”  


While six of these ‘acqui-hire’ companies have closed and been rolled into Yahoo’s mobile teams out of NYC and California, including putting Summly centre stage in the new Yahoo app, Tumblr and cross-platform back-end gaming service Playerscale have remained intact, with Astrid, which had 4m users in September last year, to remain in operation for 90 days from 1 May. 


Yahoo believes that the combination of Tumblr and Yahoo will grow its audience to more than 1bn monthly visitors from 300m in Q1.  Although a great deal has been made of Yahoo’s aggressive acquisition strategy, totalling 12 for the first half of this year, Google has actually made almost 150 acquisitions in its 12-year history, compared to Yahoo’s 83 in 16 years. 


Marcos Sanchez, VP Global Corporate Communications at App Annie, is positive about the work being done to change Yahoo’s fortunes. “From all accounts, Mayer has been doing a great job of breathing life back in to Yahoo, from re-focusing, to improving company morale to revamping products with a definite mobile bent,” he said. 


“The mobile products have been streamlined and she’s put a focus on usability, which is likely to be a contributing factor to the apps at least not losing ground. From an acquisition standpoint, don’t forget, there are many reasons for an acquisition, and not just for a technology. Mayer has proven savvy even here, shuttering some, keeping a few alive, but maintaining teams that are focused on bringing yahoo back to its’ glory days.”


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/analysis-yahoos-q2-earnings-and-meyers-first-year-ceo#pGVPFJh7WI2b55Gf.99

Half of MailOnline’s UK Readers are Mobile

The Daily Mail has revealed that 19.9m people in the UK visit the MailOnline site from their mobile device every month, 46 per cent of its monthly web audience here. 

According to figures shared exclusively with Mobile Marketing, 12.1m of those use the mobile web on their smartphone, with a further 6.1m using a tablet. The MailOnline for iPhone is its most popular app, the company said, with 2.9m downloads to date, of which there are 641,000 monthly active users and 310,103 daily visitors. On average, 40 visits are made to the app, with sessions lasting 12 minutes and 50 pages viewed.


The Android app has seen 1.1m downloads, with 460,000 monthly users and 147,024 coming back daily. The iPad app has been downloaded 1.4m times. It has 174,000 montlhy users and 42,593 daily users. 


The Daily Mail Group has announced a new Sunday edition of its iPad app, called the Mail on Sunday Plus, which will form part of a weekly subscription package or be offered as a one-off purchase. It features re-formatted Sunday magazines You and Event plus more sport, interactive TV listings and 30 puzzles. A seven-day Mail Plus subscription will start at £9.99 per month. Google Play and Kindle users will also see their subscription costs brought in line with iOS users.


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/half-mailonline-uk-readers-are-mobile#loSytwzWJthm7g6w.99

“Banks are terrified that Amazon will be a formal bank”

“Banks are terrified that Amazon will be a formal bank,” Deborah Perry Piscione – Silicon Valley entrepreneur and author of Silicon Valley Whispers – told her audience at an event at the London School of Economics. “Amazon knows how its sellers are doing at any given moment at any given day.” She said that applying for a loan with them, therefore, could happen in just six questions. 

Piscione spent the early years of her career working in national politics and the media in the US, reaching both Capitol Hill and the Whitehouse. On moving to Silicon Valley, at a time when Google was just starting to take shape and Zuckerberg was merely a topic of conversation, she found a culture quite different to the corporate world she was used to. “In Washington, we were indoctrinated into this cult that you withhold information and don’t share it,” she told an audience of students and entrepreneurs at LSE. 


“Silicon Valley was a land completely of the unknown. It took me a long time to realise what made this place so unbelievably unique. It is incredibly open and you have to get used to information sharing – often sharing with direct competitors because they can help validate your platform or product.” 


In her book, Piscione discusses what makes the culture of Silicon Valley so different. She said it’s the kind of place that can take a 23-year-old Mark Zuckerberg seriously because, unlike the hierarchies of Washington or London, people there don’t care about your age, gender or the colour of your skin. “The perception is that you’re smart and what you’re building is growing really quickly.” 


Unlimited vacation and intropreneurialsm 


She highlighted Google’s Campus, where you can get a haircut, see a doctor and even get your car’s oil changed, as an example to other businesses around the world. “So you’re not thinking about all those other tasks that bog you down on a daily basis. Netflix gives its employees unlimited vacation time. How do you motivate people based on valuing them?” 


There is also a culture of intropreneurialism, exemplified with the story of Youtube, where its founders were working at PayPal during the day and then on the platform, which started out life as a dating site, at night. And, unlike in Europe, people are allowed to fail. In fact, it might mean they are taken more seriously. She added that there is nothing more important than what is going on in HR. Focusing on people makes a “greater difference between success and failure overall.” 


Comparing Silicon Valley to London, and not without highlighting the better weather and outdoors lifestyle, she said: “Traffic in London has just gotten worse and worse.” She suggests scattering work hours around rush hour to ensure staff are less stressed and so more creative. 


The Valley’s close links with Stanford, which was founded in the 19th century with a commitment to ensure that students, faculty and professors had a connection with the local community, as well the university’s great support for the next generation, have set it apart. The heritage of VCs, the opportunity to build relationship and the supporting infrastructure, likewise. “VCs do everything possible to make that entrepreneur a success.” But its bubble-based economy, Piscione said, tends towards get rich quick rather than value creation which means: “VCs have huge pressure on them to get a quick ROI.” She said she believes platforms like Kickstarter are changing the funding game but highlighted that Silicon Valley has the support system, the networks and the people to make it more likely that a business can succeed. 


Failing national education 


But, while the Ivy League prospers, she said that primary and secondary education, as in the UK, is not doing a great job of preparing its young people for the jobs of the 21st century. California is 48th out of 50 states in terms of spending per pupil. “I’m not sure Silicon Valley has the answer on that front.” 


An audience member highlighted the latest draft of the national curriculum, which will now prioritise advanced IT from an early age. “Computing is not even the future, it’s the here and now. There has been a massive shift in the economy but the education is not giving kids, particularly girls, exposure to STEM subjects. It takes effort and really thinking outside of the box in not continuing to do things you’ve done over the last 50 years, but asking what are you going to do over the next 50 years.” 


She highlighted that PayPal founder Peter Thiel has now started his own fellowship programme, which encourages young people to opt-out of college. On the issue of working visas, she added:  “We certainly have to stop educating people at MIT, Harvard and Stanford and then sending them back home.” 


IP issues 


Asked about growing concerns around intellectual property, Piscione highlighted that Cisco spent $59m (£39.7m) last year defending their patents from “patent trolls” and suggested the need for a new international governing body on this. While many complain that the stealing only goes one way, she also pointed out that eBay “kind of copied a company out of China. Who takes it on, I don’t know – that’s got to be the conversation and the dialogue.” 


Will Apple really have the next new new thing? 


Asked about the future of some of Silicon Valley’s most prominent companies, she said: “There’s lots of conversation in Silicon Valley around will Apple have that next generation – what that new new thing is?” On the current ubiquity of services like Facebook and Google, she said: “You can’t imagine it being in your life – I just got a smartphone not long ago – you continue to resist and then can’t imagine life without it. But there will definitely be something else after Facebook and twitter – and soon.” 

Piscione questioned how much tech we really need, and whether younger generations will suffer from burnout, although she did highlight support from some in Silicon Valley towards biotech. She also warned against focusing on whether it’s web 2.0 or mobile: “because they’re all in there, we now need to look to continue to diversify our economy.”

Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here:
http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/%E2%80%9Cbanks-are-terrified-amazon-will-be-formal-bank%E2%80%9D#Q1zC3BL6d06YlRTA.99

Goodbye Visa, Hello Fingerprint Payments?

Last week’s news that a host of high profile investors have contributed a record $25m (£16.4m) seed funding for mobile payments startup Clinkle has certainly caused a stir in the industry.  

While everyone from banks, operators, retailers, payment providers, OEMs, and of course consumers seek to benefit from the innovation going on, could mobile payments end up being something of a mythical El Dorado city of gold? 

Traditional players are joining forces in some areas and appear to be thinking creatively, but do they have the agility to succeed? And what chance do startups have in taking a share of an industry which is set to be worth $235.4bn (£153.8bn) by the end of 2013? 

I spoke to two mobile payments specialists, Michael Nuciforo, futurist and former head of mobile at RBS and Australian bank ANZ, and Roy Vella, ex-PayPal and Visa Europe exec, about the current state of the market. Both now work as consultants advising major players in the mobile payments space so we asked them who they think ultimately wins in a crowded market like this. Does the market own the customer, or will consumer choice prevail?  

Truth or crap? 

While a lot of noise is being made from vendors selling ‘the next big thing’, both men urge caution. “We need to distinguish between the truth and the crap,” says Nuciforo. “When we look at what’s happening in the market, the first thing you have to understand is that a lot of the announcements that you see are purely that, they’re not necessarily fully functioning services.”  

Although consolidation may help, Vella doesn’t see this happening any time soon: “I think money’s going to get more fragmented not less. The idea that there’s a winner in mobile money is just PR.” And as operators, banks and payment providers continue to carve up their customers, Vella adds: “This ‘we’re going to own the customer and that’s going to be forever’ is ridiculous. That’s never going to happen again. It’s now as easy to move as a touch of the finger.”  

Initiatives from the biggest names in the payments industry have been slow to start or are yet to take hold but Nuciforo is betting on the banks, at least in developed markets: “Joint ventures like Weve really have to rely on coming together and trying to attack the market as a group because if they were to do that on their own, they would have no chance. But success really depends on regions and market sophistication. “In Europe, the UK, the US and parts of Australasia, I think the banks stand the strongest chance from the perspective that they have the opportunity to come together, which a lot of them still haven’t yet,” says Nuciforo. “Most importantly, payments are driven by the fact that your salary is paid into a bank account.” 

Vella takes a more critical view of these traditional players. “The banks and the operators are both trending towards commodity utilities. They’re just a central clearing house for data. The one who’s going to win is the one who provides the most convenience for the customer at that time for that particular transaction. “But it could be any brand. It could be Tesco. It could be Virgin. It could be Apple. People have brand affiliations that they like and if that brand offers them service and convenience and value, that’s what they’re going to use.” 

Middlemen will lose out 

He sees the traditional customer-merchant relationship coming back to the fore. “I think merchants and consumers are going to connect directly in as many cases as possible,” Vella says. “The losers are going to be the intermediaries like Visa and Mastercard who are trying to connect the dots between two individuals. That clearing system in the middle is not required anymore. If they’re not worrying, they ought to be.” 

In the US, the likes of Walmart, Target and Gap have come together as the Merchant Exchange to seize on the energy of mobile payments. Vella points to the potential of closed-loop merchant systems: “The most successful mobile money implementation in the developed world today is run by a coffee shop. Starbucks is holding $1.5bn in balance. Coffee that’s been purchased but not even drunk yet.  “What we all forget because we weren’t born then is that payments used to be run by the merchant. In the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, they outsourced payments to Visa and Mastercard and now they’re going to insource them back.” 

He sees this as a key time for shoppers to reassert themselves. “Consumers are definitely flexing their power in terms of transparency and understanding the market. They are going into retail stores now and bringing their phone with them and they know exactly the price of the item in front of them, globally, in every currency and they know how well it performs. I know what I know, and what everyone else I know knows, and what everyone they know knows,” he says. 

The future is Square

 So what of the weekly announcements from mobile money startups? Nuciforo is sceptical. “It is difficult to see a big player emerge though there is a lot of interesting tech coming out. Eventually I see a huge amalgamation of all these startups; some of them will die off, some of them will be bought.” Vella is more keen. “The future is Square [Wallet]. I don’t touch anything. I walk in and I walk out. I don’t want to touch my phone, I don’t want to touch my wallet. That’s the world we’re going to live in.” 

Both point to biometric as the next battleground. In Nuciforo’s native Australia, where the futurist usually looks for consumer trends yet to hit the UK, his former employer ANZ bank is already investing a huge amount in fingerprint cash machine. He says the next step for this would be fingerprint payments. 

NFC, a key element of the Weve Wallet to launch mid-2014 is a pet hate of Vella’s. “One, it’s not fast and two, nobody cares,” he said. “The difference between swiping, chipping and pinning and almost touching a reader – nobody cares. That’s not important. No value has been added. “Eventually maybe it’ll be biometric – the whole Minority Report thing – we are not far from that.”

Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and first published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/goodbye-visa-hello-fingerprint-payments#GAyGfT9ZvJLsIImV.99

Vodafone Deploys Mobile Network in Sudan’s Largest Refugee Camp

The Vodafone Foundation is deploying its portable mobile network in the largest refugee camp in Southern Sudan, an overcrowded temporary settlement that lacks basic infrastructure. 

The network should enable aid workers in the Yida camp to better help its 70,000 inhabitants, as well as being used for free by refugees to contact relatives and to deliver education programmes to children living there. 


The Instant Network weighs 100kg, fits in three suitcases and takes just 40 minutes to put together. It has already been used to provide communications during extreme weather events in Kaikor, Northern Kenya and in Davao Oriental. 


The mission will also include an assessment of a larger permanent refugee camp to look at the potential for establishing an education centre for child refugees, where they will use tablets and smartphones to provide educational resources.


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/vodafone-deploys-mobile-network-sudans-largest-refugee-camp#umw6Y83sXDWBimXY.99

18 to 25-year-olds in the UK Send 225 Messages a Week

While SMS is still the most widely used messaging service both in the UK and the US, at 96 per cent and 92 per cent respectively, multiple messaging services are now used by 75 per cent of people across both countries.  

Users of BBM send the largest volume of messages in the UK, an average of 110 per week, according to the survey done by Acision. SMS is second highest, at 75 message per week, Whatsapp at 74, with iMessage and Facebook Messenger on 64 per week. 


Young adults in the UK, not surprisingly, send 22 per cent more than any other age group – 225 every week. SMS still rules in the US however, with 111 messages sent on this channel every week. Young people aged 12 to 18 send 150 texts on average every week here.


Most people message more than 24 people on average across all these platforms, with many seeing SMS as more appropriate for work and OTT for friends. Women also send more SMSs than men. Many of the 1,000 people asked in the US and UK say they prefer OTT because these apps have richer features, like confirmed deliver, speed and cost, which was particularly important in the UK.   


On the launch of the results, Glen Murray, SVP and GM of Acision in Europe and Russia, took these results as another warning to mobile operators to up their game. “Operators have to be able to monetise five or six different things to compete today,” he said.  


The research, perhaps necessarily, did not look at all of the OTT apps used in both countries, which have evolved to services like Snapchat, Skype and MessageMe. 


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/18-25-year-olds-uk-send-225-messages-week#zcDjEpvkFd14ovTf.99

Mission mPOSsible – Decoding Mobile Card Readers

Given the number of announcements about mPOS solutions this year alone, you’d be forgiven for thinking that every market trader or corner shop owner is just a tap away from taking card payments on their phone. But the majority of some 4.8m small companies in the UK are yet to accept any kind of card payments, let alone mobile-enabled ones. 


According to a survey by Intuit of 1,000 micro-businesses, which have fewer than 10 employees, only 19 per cent currently accept card payments. But, while merchants are still getting their act together, many consumers are increasingly cashless. A study of British shoppers by Santander UK and iZettle revealed that 39 per cent avoid businesses that don’t accept card payments or require a minimum payment amount. Independent retailers, pubs and bars, market stalls, taxis, along with food and drink stands at events were all identified as potential losers. 

Here, we take a look at a range of newly launched and more established mPOS providers to reveal just how competitive the market now is. An industry-standard charge of 2.75 per cent per transaction seems to have been reached to make the offer simple for merchants. Free Apple and iOS app systems dominate, but what does this mean for emerging markets where smartphones haven’t taken hold?  

Many of the solutions don’t have a large customer base, with some reluctant to reveal their figures. Plus, some of the mPOS supporters detailed below reveal a tech proxy war in the payments space between more familiar companies, and even between different innovation hubs around the world.  But what if this doesn’t even take off? Will mPOS be superseded by contactless or peer-to-business payments before you can say swipe or sign?   

Intuit 
Intuit launched in the UK in March and is the only one of our mobile payments systems currently operating in both the US and UK, as well as Canada. It offers swipe across the pond or Chip & PIN systems to UK traders, which connect via Bluetooth to an iOS or Android app. Established in 1983, giving it a fair head start, the company also offers a range of online book-keeping services to its clients.  It was recently caught out lobbying the US government to the tune of $11.5m – more than Apple or Amazon – to ensure its tax solutions don’t get wiped out by free online accounting. 

Cost of reader: £49 or free in US (was £99) 
Cost of transactions: 2.75% on all transactions / 3.75% on manual / or a monthly plan of $13 a month (US-only) Supporters: Partners with Verizon in the US and now on sale in Staples online and in UK stores  

iZettle 
Sweden’s iZettle got off to a bumpy start when it launched in November 2012. Although it had a sales partnership with EE in the UK, the free headphone jack-connected swipe device left users unable to accept Visa payments. Nonetheless, the company says it had 100,000 customers by the end of the year. The Chip & PIN reader, which works via Bluetooth and an Android or iOS app, launched in February. It currently operates in the UK, Spain, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland and now Mexico. 

Cost of reader: Was £49 now £99 plus VAT but offering £50 cashback to Santander Business Banking customers in Spain and the UK 
Cost of transactions: 2.75% per transaction but if you’re not using the card reader, the fee is £0.10 + 3.5% per transaction 
Supporters: Santander invested €5m in June this year   

Judo
Judo launched in the UK in May and operates here on the USP that sellers and merchants do not need a smartphone or a card reader to make or accept a mobile payment. It has 2,000 small business customers at present and says it will go global if its clients require it. There are a range of transaction limits outlined by the company, but these can be waived under certain circumstances. 

Cost of reader: No device but £50 to set up account 
Cost of transactions: 2.9% + 29p  Supporters: Privately-owned    

Jusp 
Jusp (short for Just Pay) just received $6m (£3.9m) in Series A funding to develop its European Chip & PIN solution that connects via the headphone jack a la Square. The Italian company was founded by two 25-year-olds in November 2011 and is heading for a Q3 2013 launch. It offers the lowest transaction fee of any solution out there – but only just!

Cost of reader: €39 (£33) 
Cost of transactions: 2.7% Supporters: Italian VCs   

Monitise 
The UK’s Monitise launched its mPOS white-labelling service in Europe, Canada and parts of Asia in May this year. The company has a variety of live models that are chosen by its customers and the cost of each deployment depends on a variety of factors, not least of which is the size of market and type of solution. Monitise recently partnered with Blackberry to launch the BBM Money peer-to-peer  payment service in Indonesia. O2 is currently offering a Monitise mPOS for £20 (plus VAT and 2.75 per cent per transaction) to Android and BlackBerry users. 

Fees: Monitise does not set the transactional or devices fees – its customers build their own models 
Supporters: Visa   

payleven 
payleven is on offer in Brazil, a fast-growth smartphone market, along with the UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Italy and Poland. It would not disclose its usage figures, but went on sale in February 2013 with its Chip & PIN device that works via Bluetooth with an Android or iOS app. The German company launched in March last year and like Square in the US, has received the stamp of approval from Apple in the UK, where it is now on sale in retail stores.  

Cost of reader: £99 (was £49) 
Cost of transactions: 2.75% plus £20 credit for payments Supporters: Apple    

PayPal Here  
Although it will not disclose any usage figures, PayPal is among the legacy figures in this line up, and has accumulated 110m active online payments accounts since it launched in 1998. The free swipe/manual/Chip & PIN headphone jack reader and app system, PayPal Here, is ‘on its way’ to the UK this summer. It is already in use in the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and Hong Kong. The company has been accused in recent times of being slow and bureaucratic but it does have the most visibility among consumers. 

Cost of reader: Free reader 
Cost of transactions: 2.75% when you swipe a card / 3.5% plus $0.15 per transaction when you type in a card number (3.6% in Japan plus 40 Yen, increasing to 5 per cent for use of Here) 
Supporters: Owned by Ebay. And the ‘PayPal Mafia’…   

Square 
Square was founded by Twitter’s Jack Dorsey in 2009 and was first-to-market with its headphone jack and app solution, which launched first in the US. It is now on offer in Canada and Japan but they haven’t (yet) reconfigured the payments platform for use in the EU. Square currently has 4m users and has a variety of loyalty offers, including the Square Wallet and gift cards. Square recently announced that it would not allow its product to be used by gun sellers. Which is nice. Both Square and PayPal are going head-to-head with operator NTT Docomo in Japan. 

Cost of reader: Free swipe reader 
Cost of transactions: Pay 2.75% per swipe for all major credit cards (3.25% in Japan) or a flat monthly $275  Supporters: Twitter, used in Starbucks and sold in Apple’s US stores   

SumUp 
SumUp is currently on offer in the most countries around the world: the UK, Belgium, France, Portugal, Russia, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Italy, Spain and the Netherlands. It would not comment on usage figures but launched in August 2012, giving it a fair head start over other European providers. It is currently only a chip and signature solution that attaches to the headphone jack, but a PIN reader is on the way. 

Cost of reader: Free 
Cost of transactions: 2.75% Supporters: Klaus Hommels (early Skype, Facebook), Groupon and AmEx

JustGiving Just got Easier with One-touch Mobile Donations

After its mobile traffic overtook desktop for the first time back in April, JustGiving has made it even easier for smartphone and tablet users to make donations to their favourite causes. 

The JustGiving mobile website has been updated so it remembers donors’ credit or debit card details after their first donation. It is hoped that this ‘one-touch’ process will encourage repeat giving. The additional Gift Aid option has also been simplified to ensure more UK tax payers opt in. 


JustGiving anticipates that by 2014, around 70 per cent of all traffic will come from mobile devices. Its Android and iOS apps will be brought in line with this at a later date, the organisation said.


“The way that people give is changing – more than ever, people want to give wherever and whenever they want, on any device,” said Lee Marshall, product manager at JustGiving. “In a world full of distractions, it’s vital for us to continue to make giving as easy and intuitive as possible. Our next challenge now is to encourage mobile donors to give more, and more often, to their favourite causes.”


Written for Mobile Marketing Magazine and published here: http://www.mobilemarketingmagazine.com/content/justgiving-just-got-easier-one-touch-mobile-donations#ZZYqYCV6iGb3Dd9S.99